DIY Sopranino Ukulele Part 1

Ok – there are lots of things I’m supposed to be doing but here’s another project just for fun. I’ve long wanted a Sopranino Ukulele but I can’t really afford one, plus it would be fun to have a go at making one.

A Sopranino is smaller than a Soprano Ukulele – the Soprano has a scale length of around 13″/330mm and the Sopranino has a scale length of around 12″/305mm. One big advantage of this size is that I can resaw the timber on my mini-bandsaw which has a capacity of around 75mm.

This is the concept I came up with:

Design for Sopranino Ukulele
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Wanderer Dinghy – Mast Step Repair – Part 3

I’ve cut some more bits of wood. There is:

  • A big block cut from a fench post – possibly Larch. This provides somewhere for the screws to go and takes the vertical force into the old plywood hog (which I cut a section out of).
  • A top plate that is split into front and rear halves. Since the tabernacle is glued in, it isn’t possible to get the top plate in in one piece. The top plate transfers the side-to-side force into the new ribs.
  • A couple of fiddly little bits to block up the remaining hole in the front buoyancy tank.
Big block and rear top plate
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DIY Bass Ukulele

Just because I don’t have enough projects on the go 😉 I’ve started making a bass ukulele. I call it a μ-bass.

The body is an old Port Wine box. Since this wasn’t glued I’ve run Titebond around all the joints so they don’t buzz. The neck is a old piece of mahogany that has been lying around for 20 years. I bought some bass guitar tuners on eBay – I’ll need to make the slots bigger. Soundboard will be birch plywood.

Progress so far

Update 2021-05-31:

See this summary of the build.

Kids longbows

My eldest daughter asked me if we could make a bow and arrow for her. She’d done some designs and wanted to make them.

We watched some videos on YouTube on how to make bows and had a go. The first attempt broke.

Broken bow. Wood wasn’t great and was too thick when I test pulled the bow.

So we tried a different approach. I’d cut down an Ash sapling in the garden a few months ago – we’ve got Ash trees at the bottom of the garden so we get saplings growing everywhere. The top of this was about the right stiffness for a bow. So we cut off a suitable length and started work.

Trimming the side branches with an axe – watch those feet!

There are some key design points to making a bow. Any wood that is weak enough to bend is likely to break, so the idea is to trim the wood in such a way that it is still strong, bendy but doesn’t break.

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Oar repair

The oars supplied with the Wanderer (Custard) are 6′ long. Much too short for good rowing but easy to stow and thus fast to access. As described elsewhere fast access turns out to be the most important requirement for oars – for fendering off and close manoeuvering when things go wrong.

I have another set of oars supplied with the green boat (Owl). These are 6′ 6″ but I haven’t used them much:

  • They are too long for the low gunnels and high thwart of Owl – it is hard to get the blades out of the water.
  • The handle of one is damaged.

However they are a very good fit into Custard and the extra 6″ will help with rowing. So a bit of tidying up was in order.

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Wanderer aft cleats

One thing about sailing with small children is that you want to tie up to a jetty if at all possible. This means having usable cleats. It is possible to tie off to the traveller but having cleats is easier.

However, I don’t want the cleats to catch on the mainsheet or other ropes, This means they need to be somewhere out of the way. The best option appears to be to feed the rope through the handhold at the back of the side decks and forwards onto a cleat under the side deck.

I made up two plywood panels – one for each side – and attached the cleats using T-nuts. I’ve also added some spare T-nuts for other attachments, one spare cleat (it is always useful to be able to tie things on) and a clamcleat that will take string threaded through the scupper on the transom – this can be used for a foothold rope or for attaching the tent.

Reverse of the panel with T-nuts fitted. The T-nut recesses were sealed with thinned varnish.
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